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I am the first to admit that I have thought about suicide. Not in quite some time,  but as a teenager I suffered a lot of bullying and from severe depression, so I know how tempting it can be. But it is never the answer. 

Crps is nicknamed “the suicide disease” because of the intense, unrelenting pain and the lack of understanding and treatment. I haven’t personally been touched by suicide, but I know people who have attempted, and people I know have been affected by it, so I wanted to offer support for anyone thinking of it. 

The hole left in a family by suicide is impossible to fill. Family and friends blame themselves in a never ending cycle of vicious pain, self hatred,  and regret. At least if a family member dies from cancer you can place your feelings on cancer instead of blaming yourself and everyone around you for “not being able to see it”. 

Often when someone is seriously contemplating ending their life they show no or very few outward signs. They won’t broadcast how they feel, they actually seem to be doing better most of the time. That’s why it hurts so much… People who decide on suicide and have been contemplating it for some time tend to feel at peace with their decision. 

Times may seem bad, things may be hard and feel hopeless. But I cannot express strongly enough that things will get better. Reaching out to someone you trust can be the difference between a lifetime of  familial suffering and hope. Because there is always hope. 

Getting help, talking about it,  and relieving the stigma around suicide are so important. Attempting suicide doesn’t make you weak, it doesn’t make you stupid, and it doesn’t make God or a higher power hate you or condemn you. It only means that you were strong enough to survive,  and that you have the power to get better. A second chance is a powerful thing. 

If you think someone you know is suicidal, do not try and force them to get help. Talk to them. Remind them of the things they have to live for. Establish that they can trust you, and do not break that trust. Remember that you can’t force someone to get better, they have to want it. 

If you are contemplating suicide for any reason, please,  get help. Call a local suicide prevention hotline,  inform your doctor, tell a friend or loved one that you need help. If the desire to die is so strong you feel like you can’t stop yourself, please call police or your emergency services. Your loved ones will thank you for it. 

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